Cook-Off Chili Co-Post

by Sarah on March 22, 2012 · 18 comments

I’m not one of those people who only craves salad in summer, and I’ve never been one of those people–like my friend Mark–who can only eat soup when it’s cold outside. So when my dear friend Molly started talking about making her Sweet Potato Lentil Chili for dinner the other night, I didn’t think a thing of it…even though I was wearing flip-flops and finally had left the house without a coat that morning.Turns out it’s not always 70 degrees and sunny in San Francisco, however, so the 45 degrees and rainy weather she was experiencing did lend itself a little more easily to the thought of a big bowl of hearty, spicy “vegan but you wouldn’t know it” (her words, not mine) chili.She first made this yumminess for me when I stayed with her after the Foodbuzz Festival in November, while testing the recipe for an upcoming Stanford Business School Chili Cook-Off. I was immediately enamoured with it, and, after she sent me the recipe last week, I knew it was time for another co-post. After all, even though Molly isn’t a blogger, she could be…so I’ll let her take it from here–with my commentary alongside (or underneath to be more accurate) of course.

Before I posted it, she warned,”I can be a bit long-winded you know.”

My response? “It’s OK. They’re used to that.” :)

—————————-

This is a recipe for Sweet Potato & Lentil Chili that I actually entered in a recent Chili Cook-Off! As the voting system was disorganized and a winner was never announced, I’m just going to go ahead and say this is WINNING chili! (You can even say “winning” like Courtney on the Bachelor after she receives a rose if you’re feeling particularly snotty and fresh.) Despite being a vegetarian chili, we had even the most Texas Texan at the competition enjoying this meat-less version. You’ll need:

  • 2 cups of diced onions (sweet, white, whichever you have on hand) 2 cups is approx 2 LG onions  – I used red onions last weekend and it worked too!)

Or you can use 1/2 a medium onion you randomly have in your fridge. This will actually equal 1 cup. Rather than cut into a new onion, you will decide henceforth to halve the recipe. 

  • 2 cups of diced bell pepper (red, green, whichever you have on hand) 2 cups is approx 3 LG peppers

How about a combination of sweet mini peppers and wrinkly green ones (brought by Liz–but never used–to Blog Day Brunch)?

  • 4 cups of diced sweet potatoes (I am not 100% sure how many potatoes it takes to get 4 cups b/c it really depends on the size of your potatoes. But I’d think 4-6 would be safe. I’d recommend buying extras and then just measure as you chop!)

In case you were wondering, I had only one sitting on my counter. And I have since determined that it takes only one to get almost two cups of ‘chunked’ potato. (Got to love halving recipes just so you don’t have to go to the store!]

  • lots of fresh chopped garlic [So I am KINDA crazy about garlic- I usually double or even quadruple the amount of fresh garlic that most normal recipes call for. So I used an entire BULB of garlic- all of the cloves chopped quickly in my mini food processor/prep tool but if you are not trying to repel all of the vampires in the Bay Area, you could probably do 2-3 and be fine.]

I’m not a fan of Twilight, but I also wasn’t sure how I felt about mutilating an entire bulb of garlic with my poor knife skills, so I stuck to 3 very large cloves.

  • olive oil or vegetable oil (~3TBSP)
  • 2 TBSP chili powder
  • 1 TBSP cumin
  • 1 TBSP paprika, preferably Hungarian paprika
  • Salt & pepper to taste
  • 2 cups of vegetable broth

Although I had an unopened box of vegetable broth in the pantry, I also had an opened jar of Better Than Boullion in the fridge. In the efforts of using up ‘what I got’ (thank you Sublime), I went with the boullion paste.

  • One can of diced tomatoes with green chilis (I like the Trader Joe’s version!)

As I had not yet ventured to Trader Joe’s at this point in the weekend, I stuck with a can of fire-roasted diced tomatoes…sans green chiles.

  • 1.5-2 cups (depending on how lentil-y you want your chili) of Trader Joe’s steamed lentils.

I know it seems weird to use the TJ’s pre-steamed lentils which are obviously slightly more expensive than dried lentils but for some reason when I made it w/ dried lentils (the french green ones) and doubled the broth (since if you cook the lentils, you’ll need more liquid to cook the lentils), the consistency was less desirable. I’m not sure what it was about the dried lentils but despite cooking for a LONG time, the lentils still had that “bite” to them that you’d expect in say a lentil salad, whereas TJ’s pre-steamed ones really gave the chili that consistency that you’d expect from a meat-based chili.

I would like to interject and say that the version of the chili I ate in San Francisco was this one she said was “less than desireable” and I still loved it.

So, it’s up to you but since you have a TJ’s near you (and they’re not THAT expensive- say $2.99 I think), I’d recommend using that. However, if you don’t have a TJ’s nearby or want to use dried lentils, just double the amount of broth and let the chili simmer for a tad longer until fully cooked. It’s really a matter of personal texture preference.

Since by now I just wanted to see if I could make this whole recipe with things I already had at home, I grabbed this jar of red lentils from the pantry…thinking (rightly) that since red lentils get mushier than standard brown or French green…I’d get the texture that Molly I was looking for.

And now, let’s get down to this chili-making business, shall we?

Directions:

1. Saute bell peppers in oil over medium/medium high heat until they start to soften (~5-10min) — I’m sorry I can’t give you a more exact temp to cook them over but our stovetop is fairly low-tech and there aren’t really temp markings. I do a “medium sized flame” haha.

As I am in the practice of cooking along the guidelines of Whole Foods’ Health Starts Here program–every recipe could potentially lead to a cooking class!–I steamed my veggies in water. [Don’t yell at me Lele!]

2. Once peppers soften, add onions and saute til soft for another 5 minutes or so.3. Add garlic and saute til fragrant. (Again, another 5 or so minutes.) But for all of these, just watch it and stir around so nothing burns!

4. Add sweet potatoes and saute ~15-20 minutes until soft. At this point, you may need a bit more oil to cover the potatoes. Just eyeball it!

Or, if you’ve ended up with everything on the chopping board together……and you accidentally dump some of the potatoes in the pot……well, just go ahead and add ’em all at the same time.

To be honest, you don’t have to saute everything down THAT well if you’re in a time crunch since the whole chili simmers for ~30 minutes anyways once it’s all thrown together. But this is just the way that I did it for whatever that’s worth :)

It’s worth a lot. But I’m just going to jump the gun a little bit.And since whenever I see recipes for dal or other lentil stews, they tell me to stir the dry lentils in before adding liquid, I’m going to go ahead and do that, too.Molly said 1.5-2 cups of lentils depending on how ‘lentil-y’ I want it. What if I just want it to be as lentil-y as the 3/4 cups of dry lentils I have makes it?5. Add in the seasonings and broth and lentils and canned diced tomatoes and stir together.

Done.Done.And done.

6. Bring to a boil and then simmer for ~30 min for the flavors to come together.Molly didn’t tell me what to do if the only lid you happen to currently possess has vanished. So I improvised.

Our paprika had a bit of a kick to it since it was from Hungary but traditional paprika isn’t too spicy so you may enjoy adding 1/4tsp of cayenne pepper. I think it really balances the smoky cumin and sweet potatoes nicely but I was hesitant to give it too much kick for a wide audience. You can always season to taste.

How about smoked paprika?

7. Throughout the 30 minutes, just check the consistency of the chili.

You may prefer a runny-er chili, if so, you may need more broth. If you think you’d like it thicker, just add some more lentils (the pre-steamed ones from TJ’s come with 3 cups).

I just added a bit more water…while rinsing out the tomato can for recycling.

I think the chili tastes best with this specific cheese from Ttrader Joe’s – it’s a cheddar gruyere blend that is just divine- it is sharp enough to stand up to the chili. Obviously you do not NEED this and any other cheese would probably be great too as long as it has a sharp/nutty taste, can stand up to a grater but still melt when it is on top. I think a dollop of plain greek yogurt would be delicious too. I also recommend Judy’s Breadsticks Garlicky/Seedy breadstick bites on top- they can be found at some specialty grocery stores (specifically, Draeger’s in Menlo Park if you’re a Bay Area-er).

(Mostly) lactose-free for me…and although I DO still have a package of Judy’s “Lovesticks” Twigs smuggled through TSA back from San Francisco, they are the sweet currant ones I believe, and I wasn’t sure how that would pair. [Of course, now that I think about it, the whole sweet-and-spicy thing would probably be just yummy and vaguely Moroccan.]How about I top it with the random Tostitos chiplets Rachel sent me home with last time we were at her house devouring an entire jar of Newman’s Own Mild Salsa?

 I think that’ll work just fine.

———————————————–

Thanks for the AMAZING “Vegan But Ya Wouldn’t Know It” Sweet Potato Lentil Chili recipe, Molls! Even though I halved the recipe, I still ended up with quite a bunch.I do have to apologize to y’all for not having a final “plated” picture, but Molly has forgiven me.  As she said last night, “Well, it may be for the better. I have to say that chili doesn’t plate very nicely.”

I don’t know about that, though. It looks pretty darn good to me…

TwitterFacebookEmailPinterest